Archive for the ‘Native Leadership’ Category

Morgan Howard Productions video shown at Doyon Meeting

Saturday, March 21st, 2009

Doyon website topMorgan Howard Productions produced a video entitled, “Working Together” which was shown to the shareholders at the Doyon Annual meeting.  The video highlights Doyon’s ongoing committment to providing employment opportunities to its shareholders.  President Norman L. Phillips wrote a great letter in the paper earlier in the weekn entitled, “Doyon grows into economic engine” about workforce development for shareholders and all Alaskans.

Four directors were elected this year.  Jennifer Fate, Michael Fleagle, Walter Carlo and Christopher Simon.  Fate and Fleagle were re-elected and Carol and Simon replace long-time board members Florence Carroll of Juneau and Michael Irwin of Anchorage.

Florence Carroll  was not present at the meeting.  She asked for her name to be removed from the nomination list.  Mike Irwin was at the meeting and spoke directly after the election results were announced.  He was very gracious, sincere and in good humor as he spoke about his 15 years on the Doyon board.  He talked about the recent serious concerns in regard to his health and how he is now nearly back to normal.  Great news.

Doyon, Limited, the Native regional corporation for Interior Alaska, is a for-profit corporation with more than 17,500 shareholders.

Heather Kendall-Miller being considered by Obama Administration

Saturday, February 21st, 2009

Heather Kendall-MillerAs reported earlier in this blog, Heather Kendall-Miller was on the short list for a new, high level position in the Obama Administration.  Now, Indian Country writes that she has been offered the job and is currently being vetted.  Kenall-Miller is Athabascan and a Bristol Bay Native Corporation (BBNC) shareholder.

Heather Kendall-Miller’s life story is very interesting.  She dropped out of high school, married and started a family, lived in a remote cabin, went to Harvard and was friends with Barack Obama and argued in front of the US Supreme Court.  Some of that story is captured here.  This was taken from a Harvard Law Bulletin.

Heather Kendall-Miller ’91 took a winding road to Harvard Law School—and there were grizzlies and caribou along the way.

Kendall-Miller’s mother, a full-blooded Athabascan, met her father when he returned to Alaska after being stationed in the Aleutian Islands during World War II. But she died when her daughter was 2, cutting her off from her native roots.

Raised in Fairbanks, Kendall-Miller dropped out of high school and went to work on the Alaska Pipeline, homesteading in a remote valley in the mountains north of the Yukon River. At 17, she married, and she and her husband built a cabin on the land, heated it with water they piped in from a hot spring a quarter mile away.

“I look back fondly on those years,” Kendall-Miller recalls. “We were dropped off in the middle of nowhere and built our cabin in a beautiful valley in the Ray Mountains. It was a wonderful, magical place surrounded by grizzlies and caribou and moose. We had to fly in by float plane, air-drop our supplies over the cabin, and then land on a lake seven miles away and hike back to the cabin.”

Kendall-Miller became pregnant when she was 21 and lived in the cabin for another two years until her marriage collapsed. A single mother working construction on the Alaska Pipeline, she realized that her daughter needed a more stable life.

So at age 25, she enrolled at the University of Alaska in Fairbanks, where she developed an interest in Native American rights. She graduated magna cum laude and, based on the recommendation of a professor, applied to Harvard Law School.

“I knew all along that I wanted to come back to practice in Alaska,” she says. “It was exciting to be around all these incredibly smart people who were so purposeful. I knew Harvard would give me the credentials I needed to focus my career the way I wanted to and help Native Alaskans when I got back.”

Jason Metrokin named President & CEO of Bristol Bay Native Corporation

Friday, January 16th, 2009

Jason MetrokinJason Metrokin will serve Bristol Bay Native Corporation (BBNC) as President and Chief Executive Officer effective today, January 16, 2009.

Mr. Metrokin replaces President/CEO Hjalmar Olson, who announced his retirement from BBNC on November 5, 2008 after sixteen years of service. Metrokin was the Director of Shareholder and Corporate Relations of BBNC as well as a director of the Board.

The appointment of Mr. Metrokin, age 36, marks the first time an Alaska Native Regional Corporation has employed a CEO that is was born after the 1971 Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act enrollment date.  Metrokin is a descendant of an original shareholder and inherited his stock.  He joined BBNC in 2005 from the First Alaskans Institute where he served as Vice President of Development and an earlier career with National Bank of Alaska which later became Wells Fargo. His leadership experience is marked by his role as a founding member of the Alaska Native Professional Association, graduation from BBNC’s Training Without Walls, a management training program and service on several corporate and nonprofit governing boards.

Susanna Fleek-Green to work for Senator Begich

Thursday, December 11th, 2008

Susanna Fleek-GreenSusanne Fleek-Green will be Begich’s Alaska state director, based in Anchorage.  She’s an Alaska Native from Anchorage who returned home several years ago after working on her career out of state.

She worked for Begich in the city office of economic and community development before joining the campaign. Fleek-Green is a former climate change program officer for the Alaska Conservation Foundation and previously worked for Vermont Sen. Patrick Leahy, the American Farmland Trust and the U.S. Department of Interior.

Fleek-Green has a Bachelor’s degree in political economies from University of California, Berkeley and master’s degree in public policy from University of California, Berkeley.

She is a volunteer for the Alaska Youth for Environmental Action and board member at the Alaska Conservation Alliance.

 

Anchorage will host the Alaska Federation of Natives Conference in 2009

Tuesday, December 9th, 2008

While attending AFN this year, I heard some discussion about this decision.  AFN’s board of directors had been alternating between Anchorage and Fairbanks for the last four years.

This from the “News-Miner” –Sen. Albert Kookesh, who serves as co-chairman of the federation, noted the new Anchorage convention center heavily courted the federation, offering free space for the event. He also said the federation’s gatherings in Fairbanks struggled to attract people from more distant parts of the state — only a few people from the North Slope and the Aleutian Islands, for example, could attend.

“We were concerned about that,” Kookesh said by cell phone Monday.

Kookesh said the new Anchorage convention center is situated far better in the city — within a couple minutes’ walk from three or four hotels — than the Carlson Center, pointing to that fact as another major reason to hold next year’s gathering in Anchorage.